Who The Hell Knows?

download

Over the years of fighting Fibromyalgia and a basket full of “other conditions” (I ran across a lady who put it this way and have adopted it lol) you get so sick of hearing the wars of is it real or made up (riiiiiiiiiiiiiight we all just have nothing better to do than have our lives turned upside down) is it all in our heads, no wait it’s in our neurological system….oh no no WAIT it’s……Who the Hell knows?  I sure as hell know it’s “not my imagination”.

In other words nobody has a clue as to where it comes from or what causes it but there sure are some interesting stories and theories.  Most of which I totally ignore.  I mean really, please, throw me an anti-depressant for my pain in my hips ya that will work NOT…..uhhhh thanks but you’re dumb.  Just because I was a nurse doesn’t make me a know it all but I do have common sense.  I know it’s real, I know what my CI has done to me and changed my life so BITE ME.

There is a theory I am a bit interested in today.  Ok so I am a survivor of severe physical and mental child abuse (ya we’ll save that for another time just know that) now I was repeatedly kicked in the head, neck and shoulders and they went for the hips when I was down on the floor.  All of which Fibromyalgia attacks.  Hold that thought.  I came across this article on a site for Adult Survivors of Child Abuse. Now this article is NOT saying its “all in our heads” it is saying damage sustained over years and years of my body taking abuse could have reacted and broken down my immune system….food for thought.  Okay so take a read and well talk some more.

Effects on physical health

Childhood abuse doesn’t just affect the mind – it affects the body too. Children who feel perpetually in danger grow up with a heightened stress response. This in turn heightens their emotions, makes it difficult to sleep, lowers immune function, and, over time, increases the risk of a number of physical illnesses. Adult survivors of child abuse are at increased risk of chronic pain and fibromylgia, gynaecological problems, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, arthritis, headaches, cardiovascular disease, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Adult survivors of child abuse are also more likely to smoke and drink more than other people in the community, and be less physically active. These factors all impact on the burden of ill health in many survivors’ lives.

Now, I’ve read it and the only thing that is off target for me is “less physically active” until I got so sick I was a person always on the run, working double shifts etc. I didn’t become less active until I got sick.  Okay so a person may come across this and has never dealt with abuse so this theory will be thrown out the window and back to square one but I will say this.  I had a Neurologist who was testing my functions etc one day and out of the blue he asked me “did you suffer any deep physical abuse in your life” and I just stared at him like uhhhhhhhhhhhhh and then told him briefly (after all he’s not a shrink lol) he then told me he feels strongly that people who suffered the blows to my body that I did, those who were in a severe car accident SOMETHING that hurt the neuro system could be a primary cause for the nervous system to “break down” and “malfunction”.

Once again “who the hell knows” but it certainly made for more food for thought.  Personally I don’t think FM is a “mental illness”.  I have always believed it has to do with our neurological system, a neurological disorder of the brain.  MS is a neuro illness and FM mimics it to the letter.  Coinkydink?  I think not.  There is a test that a neurologist can run but the FDA refuses to make it possible.  That is a spinal tap of our fluids in the spine and check our  substance P this is one way many doctors feel can give some answers to FM.  But it’s too “expensive” to have done so let’s not approve it.  Hey I sure as heck don’t want to do a spinal tap…been there done that for a pregnancy a long time ago and ummmm ya they suck….but if it can give me/us more answers, maybe help go in another direction on RESOLVING our illness or maybe putting into a remission so we can search for a cure…..I’d do it in a heartbeat.  Would you?

So, what is your take on this blog post?  Was just food for thought really.

Hope you’re having a pain free day!

5b9f2d9ab87a47bae0570b61bb335e35

Jamie Volner Tucson Arizona

1zqg8rt

Advertisements

Clinical Definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

mghead_edited-2

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a complicated disorder characterized by extreme fatigue that can’t be explained by any underlying medical condition. The fatigue may worsen with physical or mental activity, but doesn’t improve with rest.

The cause of chronic fatigue syndrome is unknown, although there are many theories — ranging from viral infections to psychological stress. Some experts believe chronic fatigue syndrome might be triggered by a combination of factors.

There’s no single test to confirm a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. You may have to undergo a variety of medical tests to rule out other health problems that have similar symptoms. Treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome focuses on symptom relief.

Chronic fatigue syndrome has eight official symptoms, plus the central symptom that gives the condition its name:

  • Fatigue
  • Loss of memory or concentration
  • Sore throat
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your neck or armpits
  • Unexplained muscle pain
  • Pain that moves from one joint to another without swelling or redness
  • Headache of a new type, pattern or severity
  • Unrefreshing sleep
  • Extreme exhaustion lasting more than 24 hours after physical or mental exercise

When to see a doctor

Fatigue can be a symptom of many illnesses, such as infections or psychological disorders. In general, see your doctor if you have persistent or excessive fatigue.

Scientists don’t know exactly what causes chronic fatigue syndrome. It may be a combination of factors that affect people who were born with a predisposition for the disorder. Some of the factors that have been studied include:

  • Viral infections. Because some people develop chronic fatigue syndrome after having a viral infection, researchers have wondered if some viruses might trigger the disorder. Suspicious viruses have included Epstein-Barr, human herpesvirus 6 and mouse leukemia viruses. No conclusive link has yet been found.
  • Immune system problems. The immune systems of people who have chronic fatigue syndrome appear to be impaired slightly, but it’s unclear if this impairment is enough to actually cause the disorder.
  • Hormonal imbalances. People who have chronic fatigue syndrome also sometimes experience abnormal blood levels of hormones produced in the hypothalamus, pituitary gland or adrenal glands. But the significance of these abnormalities is still unknown.

Risk factors

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Factors that may increase your risk of chronic fatigue syndrome include:

  • Age. Chronic fatigue syndrome can occur at any age, but it most commonly affects people in their 40s and 50s.
  • Your sex. Women are diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome much more often than men, but it may be that women are simply more likely to report their symptoms to a doctor.
  • Lifestyle. People who are overweight and inactive are more likely to develop chronic fatigue syndrome. Stress also appears to be a factor.

Complications

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Possible complications of chronic fatigue syndrome include:

  • Depression
  • Social isolation
  • Lifestyle restrictions
  • Increased work absences

Tests and diagnosis

By Mayo Clinic Staff

There’s no single test to confirm a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. Because the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome can mimic so many other health problems, you may need patience while waiting for a diagnosis. Your doctor must rule out a number of other illnesses before diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome. These may include:

  • Sleep disorders. Chronic fatigue can be caused by sleep disorders. A sleep study can determine if your rest is being disturbed by disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome or insomnia.
  • Medical problems. Fatigue is a common symptom in several medical conditions, such as anemia, diabetes and underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Lab tests can check your blood for evidence of some of the top suspects.
  • Mental health issues. Fatigue is also a symptom of a variety of mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A counselor can help determine if one of these problems is causing your fatigue.

Diagnostic criteria

To meet the diagnostic criteria of chronic fatigue syndrome, you must have unexplained, persistent fatigue for six months or more, along with at least four of the following signs and symptoms:

  • Loss of memory or concentration
  • Sore throat
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your neck or armpits
  • Unexplained muscle pain
  • Pain that moves from one joint to another without swelling or redness
  • Headache of a new type, pattern or severity
  • Unrefreshing sleep
  • Extre

Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome focuses on symptom relief.

Medications

  • Antidepressants. Many people who have chronic fatigue syndrome are also depressed. Treating your depression can make it easier for you to cope with the problems associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. And low doses of some antidepressants also can help improve sleep and relieve pain.
  • Sleeping pills. If home measures, such as avoiding caffeine, don’t help you get better rest at night, your doctor might suggest trying prescription sleep aids.

Therapy

The most effective treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome appears to be a two-pronged approach that combines psychological counseling with a gentle exercise program.

  • Graded exercise. A physical therapist can help determine what types of exercise are best for you. Inactive people often begin with range-of-motion and stretching exercises for just a few minutes a day. If you’re exhausted the next day, you’re doing too much. Your strength and endurance will improve as you gradually increase the intensity of your exercise over time.
  • Psychological counseling. Talking with a counselor can help you figure out options to work around some of the limitations that chronic fatigue syndrome imposes on you. Feeling more in control of your life can improve your outlook dramatically.

Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome focuses on symptom relief.

Medications

  • Antidepressants. Many people who have chronic fatigue syndrome are also depressed. Treating your depression can make it easier for you to cope with the problems associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. And low doses of some antidepressants also can help improve sleep and relieve pain.
  • Sleeping pills. If home measures, such as avoiding caffeine, don’t help you get better rest at night, your doctor might suggest trying prescription sleep aids.

Therapy

The most effective treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome appears to be a two-pronged approach that combines psychological counseling with a gentle exercise program.

  • Graded exercise. A physical therapist can help determine what types of exercise are best for you. Inactive people often begin with range-of-motion and stretching exercises for just a few minutes a day. If you’re exhausted the next day, you’re doing too much. Your strength and endurance will improve as you gradually increase the intensity of your exercise over time.
  • Psychological counseling. Talking with a counselor can help you figure out options to work around some of the limitations that chronic fatigue syndrome imposes on you. Feeling more in control of your life can improve your outlook dramatically.

Lifestyle and home remedies

By Mayo Clinic Staff

These self-care steps may be helpful:

  • Reduce stress. Develop a plan to avoid or limit overexertion and emotional stress. Allow yourself time each day to relax. That may mean learning how to say no without guilt.
  • Improve sleep habits. Go to bed and get up at the same time each day. Limit daytime napping and avoid caffeine, alcohol and nicotine.
  • Pace yourself. Keep your activity on an even level. If yo

Alternative medicine

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Many alternative therapies have been promoted for chronic fatigue syndrome. It’s difficult to determine whether these therapies actually work, partly because the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome often are linked to mood and can vary from day to day.

Pain associated with chronic fatigue syndrome may be helped by:

  • Acupuncture
  • Massage
  • Yoga or tai chi

Disclaimer:  Chronic Gal (Jamie Volner) does not provide medical advice.  Please advise your Primary Physician if you think you are  experiencing any symptoms listed.

ChronicGal400

 

 

 

 

5b9f2d9ab87a47bae0570b61bb335e35

 

 

 

Jamie Volner – Tucson Arizona

CFS Pain & Fatigue

cpf

Ahhhh good old Chronic Fatigue Syndrome aka CFS.  These past few days CFS just hit me out of the blue as per usual.  I have learned to detect the “warning signs” for me.  I start feeling “flu like” with a slight headache that nothing relieves, my glands in my throat and tonsils feel “feverish” and a bit sore and keeping my eyes open is next to impossible.  It’s taken me quite a while just to type this little bit so far…I keep dozing off.

I remember what “normal” tiredness felt like and I can tell you…..CFS is not it.  Not even anywhere  near the category of normal tiredness.  CFS is a nasty cycle and until it runs it course from days to weeks on end the best you can do is ride the storm of exhaustion.  Your concentration levels run from super slow to ADD like.  Mine at the moment is forgetfulness and some aphasia .  I can think what I need to say but when I open my mouth to talk, not so much.  I come off sounding like a babbling goof ball.

Make sure you listen to your body.  Your body will tell you to go lie down and rest but your brain will tell you to “stop being lazy”and go get this and that done.  We’ll safe that for another blog post.  You CANNOT feel guilty for  your lack of energy…chronic illness has  a “mind” of its on and your mind will put a lot of pressure on you to do things to the point of “over doing thingt” and you will pay for it even longer.

Pace yourself and be patient with yourself.

Chronic fatigue syndrome has eight official symptoms, plus the central symptom that gives the condition its name:

  • Fatigue
  • Loss of memory or concentration
  • Sore throat
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your neck or armpits
  • Unexplained muscle pain
  • Pain that moves from one joint to another without swelling or redness
  • Headache of a new type, pattern or severity
  • Unrefreshing sleep
  • Extreme exhaustion lasting more than 24 hours after physical or mental exercise

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms often I would recommend bringing your doctor into the picture just to be on the safe side.  I myself and writing to you in bed with my laptop and my eyes closing every few seconds.

Be well and tell me, how do you deal with CFS?

ChronicGal400

 

 

 

5b9f2d9ab87a47bae0570b61bb335e35

 

 

Visit Me On Facebook